Wine Down

Meet the Makers – Sue Hodder, Wynns Coonawarra Estate Part 2

Meet the Makers – Sue Hodder, Wynns Coonawarra Estate Part 2

Take an inquisitive, intelligent young girl from a quintessentially Aussie town. Give her room to move, and horses to ride. Imbue her with a profound, innate connection to country. Grow her up at a transformative time of social change and political exuberance.
Meet the Makers – Sue Hodder, Wynns Coonawarra Estate Part 1

Meet the Makers – Sue Hodder, Wynns Coonawarra Estate Part 1

For Sue Hodder – esteemed senior winemaker at Wynns Coonawarra Estate – connection to the earth is a profound and life-long interaction with the land – its animals, plants, and seasons. It’s central not only to her work, but to her life, and her worldview.
Queensland

Queensland

They don’t call it the Sunshine State for nothing. Most of Queensland receives an average of between eight and nine hours of sunshine every day - and not those watered-down rays that you get south of the Tweed. This is your searingly hot, moist ’n sweaty, Non-Daylight-Saved sunshine. Theoretically, it shouldn’t be possible to produce great wine here, but somebody forgot to tell that to Queenslanders.
The Big Questions

The Big Questions

Whether interrogating Winemakers or trying to ascertain what time dinner will be, WineDown does not shy from asking the big questions. So, here are a few for your earnest consideration.
Wine in Lockdown

Wine in Lockdown

You’ve gotta love lockdown. Or at least, you might as well. There’s no point in wishing your life away – and there are definite upsides.
Tassie Mania

Tassie Mania

Never been to Tassie? You’re nuts. Put it on your bucket list right now!
Golden Oldies

Golden Oldies

If you can still sing the Aeroplane Jelly song; if you actually remember Vietnam, Apollo 11, decimal conversion, and the Johnnies O’Keefe and Farnham, chances are you’ve tasted one of these wines. And, while it’s easy now to scoff at such old-fashioned fruity crowd-pleasers (the wines, not the Johnnies), they are the very products that transformed beer-chugging, fortified-sipping Aussies into the urbane sophisticates we have become.
Meet the Makers – Chris Hatcher, Wolf Blass Part 2

Meet the Makers – Chris Hatcher, Wolf Blass Part 2

Born in Adelaide in the 1950s, young Chris Hatcher relishes life in the slow lane – attending Sunday School and enjoying alcohol-free shindigs with his devoutly Methodist parents. Introduced to wine by a church-going friend as a teen, Hatch experiences a happy epiphany: Wine tastes good! Even better – it doesn’t necessarily lead directly to perdition. Later, studying for his science degree, Hatch takes a year away from the books, scoring a job at the Australian Wine Research Institute. A flame is lit; the die is cast.
Meet the Makers – Chris Hatcher, Wolf Blass Part 1

Meet the Makers – Chris Hatcher, Wolf Blass Part 1

When Chris Hatcher arrived at Wolf Blass to take up a position as winemaker, he expected to stick around for four, maybe five years. Already a white wine and sparkling specialist, he figured he’d stay just long enough to pick up some pointers on how to make great reds, and then be on his way. That was in 1987. This year, the celebrated Chief Winemaker and head custodian of the WB brand celebrates 34 years with Blass.
The Hunter Valley

The Hunter Valley

Whatever else you might think about the arrival of the first fleet on these shores in 1788, you’ve gotta admire the logistics. Eleven sailing vessels carrying around 1500 human beings on a voyage of more than 24,000 kms, lasting 252 days – with just three stops for watering and re-provisioning. The last of these before the long, lonely, lurching leg across the Indian and Southern Oceans, was in Cape Town. There, the fleet stocked up on vegetables, grains, fruit, all manner of poultry and livestock, young trees, plants, berries and... grapevines.
Port

Port

Yachties know it as the opposite of starboard. For Queenslanders, it’s the thing you take on holidays – with your togs packed inside. For everybody else, it’s the luscious, cockle-warming, toffee-and-fruitcake fortified wine from the Douro Valley in Portugal...
The Next Big Things in Wine

The Next Big Things in Wine

The future of wine is the hands of a whole new generation of consumers, and they see things a bit differently to the old guard. As a result, the Next Big Things in wine are likely to be... well... small.